en / it / es

Exodus

 

 

out emerged as a response to the governments decision to carry out this project defined by top-down planning, the typical urban expression of “Big Government”. OUT has been able to establish itself as an open platform for social mobilisations composed of neigborhood associations, popular and creative forces, the remains of the industrial past, the new residents, in short, the real city.


Exodus is one of the key words in the post-Fordist lexicon. It has been transformed from a classic category in the thinking of the Italian worker of the seventies to a tool that is now decisive in the interpretation of practices of all kinds within the new global order: modes of production, communications techniques and lifestyles. Today, an exodus not only evokes the emigration image; it has been reduced to an ordinary condition, and, as such, is susceptible to being transformed into a new space for politicization. According to Paolo Virno, the exodus, far from being a phenomenon that exonerates one from obligations and responsibilities, is one of the most productive and affirmative contemporary processes. Only through abandonment (thus, through a negative practice) can “pure belonging” be defined, which is to say the belonging that in itself emancipates one from all the classic collective identities and from the genres to which it is possible to belong: traditions, peoples, roles, and social classes, etc. In short, the extended exodus is seen not as a space of removal, but as a space that is constructed upon each occasion in order to foster a contingent, empirical exit. It is the place in which one accomplishes the act of desertion, a space totally outside of conflict (“voice,” as Hirschman would say).


When we speak of OUT, the office installed by the artist Bert Theis in Milan in 2002 as an urban-scale  “community service,” it forces us to engage in this kind of deliberation. We might even start with the name of the project itself. Its logotype, three black “Arial” type letters on a white background make up the acronym for the “Office of Urban Transformation.” But the English word “out” also means “exit.” Even if it doesn’t express a precise goal, it at least suggests a program. So what is the true force of the project in practice?

OUT, whose headquarters opened in Milan and extended to Mexico City in 2004, is a flexible, collective work experience that brings together artists, architects, and cultural and popular groups, all of whom are participants in social activism. Its place and date of birth are indications of its emerging situationist character that enables it to locate itself outside of a generalizing vision and, at the same time, within the city’s direct, concrete experience. The office space itself constitutes an occupation of an old factory building owned by the City Hall of Milan that was about to be demolished. It is located in the Isola (island) neighborhood near the downtown area in an urban void whose future has remained unsolved for many years.  Since the nineties it has been threatened by a plan that would radically change the urban morphology and support only the leading sectors of Milan’s economy, such as the “Fashion City” project. The rest of the buildings would be utilized as a new regional public administration headquarters. OUT emerged as a response to the government’s decision to carry out this project defined by top-down planning, the typical urban expression of “Big Government.” OUT has been able to establish itself as an open platform for social mobilizations composed of neighborhood associations, popular creative forces, those who are left over from the industrial past, the new residents, in short, the real city. Bert Theis has installed himself in a context in which a number of different forces are now acting, a space for people that Holston would define as the “insurgent citizenry.” The artist intends to play a catalytic role, that of a coordinator who, in the best of cases, functions as a mediator between groups with opposing interests.  He or she doesn’t act as their representative before government officials, given that current forms of social mobilization do not require answers from authorities. Thus, we may speak of an exodus from the institutions, of the immediate appropriation of productive modes of organization. In this sense, Theis’s strategies are in line with the operational vision of the most radical sector of contemporary artists, including Maria Eichhorn, Superflex, Christoph Schafer, and others. Nevertheless, OUT and some earlier projects related to it (Philosophische Plattform,  Munster 1997) propose a physical space of undetermined use that is subordinate to processes involving people and their efforts to initiate projects, organize, build. The artist provides the framework for these activities. One representative example consists of images elaborated by OUT to support the activities of neighborhood organizations. Likewise, the collective project for remodeling the ex-factory stemmed from a consultation among its inhabitants, each of whom presented a written or illustrated proposal based on a common outline. In short, a long line of artists have collaborated in interior and exterior projects (like the gardens on Confalonieri Street.), always with collective forms of self-organization. The Office of Urban Transformation is based on three basic principles  necessary to foster reflections on the city: analyzing, dreaming, transforming. The principles are closely related to the three points put forth by Lefebvre in La Production de L’Espace. They are rooted in the office’s fundamental work: providing a framework for numerous case studies, which converts OUT into a space that is nomadic and, at once, specific. One of its most recurrent themes, that of “dreaming the city,” led to conceiving of it is a “city-jungle.” This is also the case of the collages that feature Milan, Genova, Tirana (in Albania) and Munich (in Germany). They combine visionary images of indefinite natural realities with the architecture of the cities in question, mixing a radical kind of eco-urbanism with the use of new telecommunications technologies.

Western post-communist cities are not the only objects of study. Since 2004 the   nineteenth-century Santa Maria La Ribera neighborhood in Mexico City has been a focal point of the office’s architectonic research and social activation. Although its own set of problems is very different from that of the Isola neighborhood, it shares the will to participate in the historical rescue of the physical remains of the past. In fact, the OUT-Mexico space has a new headquarters and logotype in Mexico City that are the “negative” version of the original.


Marco Scotini 2004

First published in the Mexican magazine “Espacio”, may 2005

 

 

en / it / es

Esodo

 

 

Di fronte alla tipica espressione urbanistica del Big Government e ad una pianificazione di tipo top-down, “out” cerca di istituirsi  come una piattaforma aperta e d’intervento in grado di catalizzare le mobilitazioni sociali, le istanze del quartiere, le forze immaginative dal basso, le tracce del passato industriale, i nuovi outsider.

“Esodo” è una parola chiave del lessico postfordista. Da categoria classica del pensiero operaista italiano anni settanta è diventata ora un tool decisivo per interpretare qualsiasi pratica del nuovo ordine globale: modi di produzione, tecniche di comunicazione e stili di vita. Non più e non solo legato all’immagine dell’emigrazione, l’esodo è ridotto ormai a condizione ordinaria e, proprio perché tale, in grado di divenire un nuovo spazio di politicizzazione.
Per Paolo Virno l’esodo, tutt’altro che esonerare da obblighi e responsabilità, è tra le figure più affermative e produttive della contemporaneità. Solo l’abbandono (e quindi un’azione negativa) sarebbe in grado di definire la “pura appartenenza”, l’appartenenza in quanto tale, una volta che essa si sia emancipata da tutte le identità collettive classiche, da tutti gli specifici “a che cosa”: ruoli, tradizioni, popoli, classi sociali, etc. Dunque l’esodo non come spazio di semplice sottrazione ma come luogo da costruire di volta in volta, come esito empirico e contingente. Non uno spazio conflittuale (voice avrebbe detto Hirschman) ma il luogo di un’attiva defezione.

Parlare di “out”, lo studio che l’artista Bert Theis fonda a Milano nel 2002 come “servizio” collettivo a scala urbana, significa confrontarsi con questo ordine di considerazioni. E forse a partire proprio dal nome stesso del progetto. Tre caratteri neri in font ‘arial’ su fondo bianco costituiscono il logo dello studio e sono l’acronimo di Office for Urban Transformation. Ma “out” significa anche “exit”, “uscita” appunto: se non un obiettivo, almeno un programma. Ma qual’ è la reale portata della proposta messa in atto?

Con sede prima a Milano, poi dal 2004 anche a Mexico City, “out” è un’esperienza di lavoro collettiva e flessibile che unisce al suo interno artisti, architetti, associazioni culturali e di quartiere, figure dell’attivismo sociale. Data e luogo di nascita sono sintomatici del carattere emergenziale e situazionale del progetto, tali da porlo fuori dalla necessità di una visione generalizzante e all’interno di una esperienza concreta, diretta, sul campo. Lo stesso ufficio di “out” è uno spazio occupato dentro una fabbrica dismessa di proprietà comunale e in attesa di demolizione situata nel quartiere Isola di Milano. Un quartiere storico e centrale posto a fianco di uno dei vuoti urbani milanesi tradizionalmente irrisolti e su cui, dalla fine degli anni novanta, pende la minaccia di un piano di radicale trasformazione urbana che prevede il sostegno allo sviluppo di settori di punta dell’economia milanese come la moda (il progetto ‘Città della moda’ risale al 2001) e l’insediamento di nuove sedi della pubblica amministrazione.

“out” nasce dunque in risposta  alla decisione dell’amministrazione di realizzare il progetto Garibaldi-Repubblica. Di fronte alla tipica espressione urbanistica del Big Government e ad una pianificazione di tipo top-down, “out” cerca di istituirsi  come una piattaforma aperta e d’intervento in grado di catalizzare le mobilitazioni sociali, le istanze del quartiere, le forze immaginative dal basso, le tracce del passato industriale, i nuovi outsider. In sostanza: la città reale.  Inserendosi in un contesto già fortemente compromesso, in uno di quegli spazi che Holston avrebbe definito di “cittadinanza insorgente”, Bert Theis pensa ad un progetto in cui il ruolo dell’artista è soprattutto quello dell’attivatore, del coordinatore, di chi riesce a moderare vari gruppi di interessi che altrimenti colliderebbero tra loro. Tuttavia non quello di chi media con i poteri istituzionali perché le attuali forme di mobilitazione non chiedono ad altri di fornire risposte, ma fanno da sole. Si tratta dunque di un esodo dall’istituzione, della riappropriazione immediata delle forme produttive e dell’attivazione di pratiche costituenti. In questo senso le strategie messe in campo da Bert Theis condividono lo stesso orizzonte operativo della parte più radicale della scena artistica contemporanea con figure come Maria Eichhorn, Superflex, Christoph Schäfer ed altri. Ma nel caso di “out”, come in esperienze precedenti quali “Philosophische Plattform” a Münster del ‘97, Bert Theis realizza uno spazio indeterminato che sta soprattutto ai differenti processi di coinvolgimento della gente cercare di gestire, organizzare, costruire. L’artista fornisce in sostanza una cornice di riferimento. Un esempio può essere rappresentato dalla produzione di immagini elaborate da “out” ai fini della lotta delle associazioni del quartiere. Oppure il progetto collettivo sull’edificio dell’ex-fabbrica che si intende salvare e nato come risultato di un’inchiesta tra gli abitanti, ognuno dei quali ha fatto una proposta scritta o illustrata a partire da uno schema comune di base. E infine una serie di progetti di artisti noti che sono stati realizzati, secondo differenti modalità, nei giardini di Via Confalonieri.

Gestito con forme collettive di autorganizzazione, l’Ufficio per la Trasformazione Urbana si attiene a tre principi base per pensare la città. Molto vicini ai tre punti di Lefebvre ne “La production de l’espace”, questi tre principi-guida sono: capire la città, sognare la città, trasformare la città. Nati all’interno del quartiere Isola, e di volta in volta resi operativi, anch’essi diventano una sorta di cornice di riferimento per altrettanti case-studies con cui “out” si trasforma in uno spazio nomade e puntuale. Uno dei temi ricorrenti – sognare la città – fa assumere alla città i caratteri di un jungle-space sia nel caso di Milano, che di Tirana, di Monaco o di Lipsia. Sono immagini visionarie, collage di indeterminate realtà naturali e isolate realtà architettoniche, che coniugano un eco-urbanismo radicale con il potenziamento delle nuove tecnologie. Ma non sono solo le città del post-comunismo ad essere indagate assieme alle città occidentali: dal 2004 anche il quartiere ottocentesco di Santa Maria La Ribera a Mexico City è diventata un cantiere di ricerca architettonica e di attivazione sociale. Il problema è qui radicalmente diverso dal quartiere Isola anche se è comune la volontà di salvare la storia dell’insediamento, le sue tracce fisiche. Anzi, coordinato dall’architetto Lorenzo Rocha Cito, lo spazio “out” ha qui, in Santa Maria La Ribera, una nuova sede e un logo che è il calco negativo dell’altro.


Marco Scotini 2004

Articolo pubblicato dalla revista  messicana “Espacio”, maggio 2005  

Éxodo

 

 

“out” surge como una respuesta a la decisión del gobierno de llevar a cabo el proyecto de acuerdo  a la típica expresión urbanistica del “Big Government”, con un tipo de planificación “top-down” (de arriba hacia abajo) “out” ha procurado instituirse como una plataforma abierta para las  movilizaciones social del barrio compuestas por las asociaciones de vecinos, las fuerzas creativas populares, los restos del pasado industrial, los nuevos pobladores, en suma: la ciudad real.


“Éxodo” es una de las palabras clave del léxico post fordista. Se ha trasformado de una categoría clásica del pensamento obrero italiano de los setenta, a una herramienta que actualmente es decisiva para la interpretatión de cualquier prática dentro del nuevo orden global: modos de producción, técnicas de la comunicación y estilos de vida. El éxodo hoy en día no está únicamente ligado a la imagen de la emigración, se ha reducido a una condición ordinaria y como tal, susceptible de transformarse en un nuevo espacio para la politización. Según Paolo Virno, el éxodo lejos de ser una figura que esonera de las obligaciones y responsabilidades, es una de las prácticas comtemporáneas más productivas y afirmativas. Solamente mediante el abandono (y por tanto mediante una prática negativa) se podría definir la “pertenencia pura” o la pertenencia que por sí sola emancipa de todas la identidades colectivas clásicas y de los géneros a los cuales es posible pertenecer: tradiciones, pueblos, roles y classe sociales, etc. En resumen, el éxodo es entendido no como espacio de sustracción sino como un lugar que se construye en cada ocasión para propiciar una salida empírica y contingente. El lugar para realizar la acción de la deserción, un espacio totalmente fuera de conflicto (“voice” como diría Hirschman).


Hablar de ”out”, la officina instalada por el artista Bert Theis en Milán durante el 2002 como un “servicio a la comunidad” a escala urbana, nos lleva forzosamente a este orden de considerationes. Partendo incluso desde el nombre mismo del proyecto. Su logotipo, tres letras negras tipo Arial sobre un fondo blanco son el acrónimo de “Office for Urban Transformation”. Pero la palabra inglesa “out” también significa “exit” o salida: si bien no platea un objetivo preciso, al menos sugiere un programa.

¿Pero cuál es la verdadera fuerza de la propuesta en la práctica?
“out”, cuya sede comienza en Milán y se extiende a la ciudad de México en 2004, es una experiencia de trabajo colectivo y flexible que reúne artistas, arquitectos y asociaciones de tipo cultural y popular, todas ellas figuras del activismo social. Su lugar y fecha de nacimiento son señales de su carácter emergente y situacionista que le permite localizarse fuera de la visión generalizzante y a su vez dentro de la experiencia directa y concreta de la ciudad. El espacio mismo de la officina constituye una ocupación del edificio de una vieja fábrica propiedad del ayuntamiento de Milán en espera de ser demolida. Se sitúa en el barrio Isola (la Isla), un área cercana al centro de la ciudad, adyacente a un vacío urbano que ha permanecido por años en espera de solución. Sobre él gravita desde los años Noventa un plan radical de cambio en la morfologia urbana que está dirigido a apoyar a los sectores punta de la economìa milanesa. Uno de estos sectores, se alojará dentro del proyecto llamado “Ciudad de la Moda”. El resto de los edificios se utilizarán para las nuevas sedes de la administraciòn pública regional.

“out” surge como una respuesta a la decisión del gobierno de llevar a cabo el proyecto de acuerdo  a la típica expresión urbanistica del “Big Government”, con un tipo de planificación “top-down” (de arriba hacia abajo) “out” ha procurado instituirse como una plataforma abierta para las  movilizaciones social del barrio compuestas por las asociaciones de vecinos, las fuerzas creativas populares, los restos del pasado industrial, los nuevos pobladores, en suma: la ciudad real. Bert Theis se ha instalado en un contexto donde ya actúan una variedad de fuerzas, un espacio de aquellos que Holston definirla como “ciudadanía insorgente”. El artista pretende jugar un papel de catalizador, el coordinador que en el mejor caso funge como mediator entre los con interesse opuestos. No actúa como su ripresentante ante las instancias oficiales ya que las formas actuales de movilización social no requieren de respuestas por parte de las autoridades. Se trata por tanto de un éxodo de las instituciones, de la apropiación immediata de los modos productivos de organización. En este sentido, las estrategias de Theis comparten la visión operativa de la parte más radical de los artistas contemporáneos entre los que se cruenta a Maria Eichhorn, Superflex, Christoph Schäfer y otros.. Sin embargo, « out » y algunos de sus proyectos anteriores (Philosophische Plattform”, Münster, 1997) proponen un espacio físico de udo indeterminato que se subordina a los procesos de involucramiento de la gente, a sus intenciones de gestionar, organizar y costituir. El arista aporta el marco de referenzia para estas actividades. Un ejemplo representativo son las imágenes elaboradas por « out » para apoyar las actividades de las organizaciones del barrio. De igual maniera, el proyecto colectivo para la remodelación de la antigua fábrica que nace de una consulta entre sus habitantes, cada uno de ellos hizo una propuesta escrita o ilustrada a parir de un esquema común. También el proyecto “La Línea del Tiempo” del gruppo de arquitectos A12, hecho en el interior del edificio es un ejemplo que, reuniendo la información que ha aparecido en los periódicos, refuerza el trabajo de la officina. Y en fin, toda toda la serie de artistas que han collaborado en proyectos interiores y exteriores (como los jardines de la calle Confalonieri) siempre con formas colectivas de auto organización. La Officina de Transformación Urbana se basa en tre principios básicos para su reflexión acerca de la ciudad: analizar soñar, transformar. Estos principios son muy cercanos a los tres puntos que Lefebre espone en “La Productin de l’Espace”. El origen de los principios proviene  del trabajo fundamental de la officina: proveer un marco para numerosos estudios de caso, con lo que “out” se converte en un espacio nómada y a la vez puntual. Uno de sus temas más recurrentes como “soñar la ciudad” hacen concepirla como “ciudad-jungla”. Éste es el caso de lo collages hechos sobre Milán, Génova, Tirana (en Albania) y Munich (en Alemania). Se trata de imágenes visionarias de realidades naturales indefinidas combinadas con la arquitectura de dichas ciudades coniugando un tipo radical de eco urbanismo con el aprovechamiento de las neuvas tecnologìas de telecomunicatión.

No sólo la ciudades post-comunistas y occidentales son objecto de su estudio, también desde 2004 el barrio decimonónico de Santa María La Ribera en la ciudad de México se ha convertido en un punto de intéres de la investigación arquitectónica y activación social propias de la officina. Su problemática aun siendo muy diferente a la del barrio La Isla, comparte la voluntad de rescate histórico de los restos físicos de su pasado. De hecho, el espacio de “out”-México tiene en aquella ciudad una neva sede y logotipo que son la versión “en negativo” del original.


Marco Scotini 2004   (Espacio 2005)